Scientific Anglers Air Cel Fly Line Review

Cliché as it may sound but fishing is one of the most relaxing and fulfilling pastimes. Some anglers even bring their kids along on their weekend fishing trips, and although there were surely times when they failed to catch anything, it always proved to be a worthwhile effort.

Even when the kids get older, they can still join you on your weekend fishing trips and for many, little has changed. You still need to get up before 4 or 5 in the morning and probably pile into an old, trusty pick-up afterwards. Most experienced anglers also probably set up camp in the same spot by the same lake on their favorite fishing grounds. And many of them are using the classic Scientific Anglers Air Cel Fly Line along with their old fishing rod, just like they used many years back.

Unlike much of the new fishing lines being released on the market today, the Scientific Angler Air Cel Fly Line doesn’t come with welded loops or ends, but that doesn’t make it any less reliable. Sure, anyone loyal to the brand may have had the occasional fluke over the years where the line curls up on the reel not long after it’s been stalled, as one Scientific Anglers Air Cel Fly Line Review pointed out. But the people from the company are usually kind enough to replace it for you with something that is eminently more durable.

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How to Trout Fish with a Fly Rod – Part 5 the Fly Line Profile

how to trout fish the fly line profileIn the last post we discussed some of the physical attributes of fly lines. These included color, density and weight. Fly lines have a lot more going on than these including front taper, head, back taper, belly, and running line. These characteristics are mostly to do with the aerodynamics of the fly line how it handles in the the air when casting etc. Some of these characteristics also effect the handling when in the water for retrieval etc we will discuss these and look at what types of line to look for when fishing different locations and water types.

The fly line is made from one continuous piece of core line covered with different layers of polymers to create the different densities of line. These polymers are laid down to create a thickening of the line as it progresses from the tip until its thickest part then it tapers down again until the end of the line. The differences in these tapers have been developed to produce new types of fly line. (more…)

How to Trout Fish with a Fly Rod – Part four, the Fly Line

the fly line

In the last post we looked at the fly fishing reel which holds the fly fishing line. The fly line is the part that takes the flies out into the water so we can catch fish and trout. In traditional bait and spin fishing the line either monofilament, fluorocarbon or braid, is a lot thinner and more supple than the fly fishing angler line.

The fly line is usually much thicker, comes in many colors and is about 30 yards long. When correctly matched to the fly rod and reel the line allows us to cast our flies out onto the water with an action that lifts many yards of line at a time, forces it behind us and then out again onto the water.

This action called the overhead fly fishing cast is the basic form of fly fishing and the one most practiced. OK that’s the basics lets see what to look out for when learning how to trout fish with a fly rod using a fly line.

There are many permutations to fly line and this seems to increase every year as manufacturers come up with new enhancements for us to try on our favorite waterways and rivers. Fly lines come in different weights, colors, densities and multi-variations of the same. Lets look at these in order to discover the differences and how they can effect the fishing performance. (more…)

How to Choose a Fly Line

There are many fly fishing lines on the market today made by many different manufacturers. If you do a search on Google you will come up with hundreds if not thousands of lines. For a beginner this is an overload of information and can lead to the incorrect purchase. Here we will consider the options available and show you how to choose a fly line suited to your needs.

If you have not already purchased a single handed trout fly fishing rod then you would need to consider that first as the line needs to match the rod and reel setup. In that instance you can purchase a ready made kit from a reputable dealer which can include all the items required to start out.

These are all made to match and balance the setup and are ideal for someone on a low budget. However if you can afford a little more I would recommend buying the items individually as you can still get bargains but items with more strength and options than in a basic kit.

How to choose a fly line

The first important aspect is to match you line rating to the rod you have or are considering. Each rod now has a line rating stamped on the butt section usually above the cork handle on the first few inches of the rod itself.

This figure is put there by the rod manufacturer and is a guide as to which line the rod has been made to make it a balanced setup. (more…)

How to Fly Fish

Have you ever thought about learning how to fly fish?  It may be you have watched a fly fishing angler casting a trout rod across a river or lake and wondered could you do that. Well I can tell you that fly fishing is no harder to perform than lure fishing when you correctly buy well balanced equipment and take a few lessons. You could get to grips with it without the lessons but if you are a complete novice I would advise you get some as it will save you time and effort in the long run.

To begin with what is fly fishing?

Fly fishing is the sport where someone uses a fly rod to cast a fly line with flies across a river or lake and retrieves them in a number of manners to try and entice the target fish into taking. Flies are hooks tied up with feathers and materials to either look like natural insects or coloured in such a way to make an aggressive reaction from the fish.

These flies are tied to the fly line with a leader material and are cast using the rod and line. The basic fly cast is called the overhead cast and consists of the fly line being pulled through the air in front and behind the caster. The line is kept in the air in that it doesn’t touch the water or bank during the cast. The rod is loaded by the line to put energy into the cast so it can be accelerated and cast great distances in front on the fly fishing angler.

When optimum cast length is achieved the fly is allowed to land on the water and then retrieved in different manners to try and entice the trout or fish to grab the fly. At this point the hook is set and the fight begins. There are a vast array of permutations for fly fishing including rod length, fly line density, fly line weight, casting technique, leader length and pattern of flies to name the most common.How to Fly Fish

A little History on Fly Fishing (more…)

The Fly Fishing Line

The Fly Fishing Line

The Fly Fishing Line is a lot thicker than traditional monofilament fishing line. To get your fly out into the water in an attractive gentle method takes practice and some skill. The fly fishing line

These can be learned but the fly fishing line is critical to the cast, get it wrong and you may as well not bother fishing at all.

A bad cast will collapse and crash onto the water surface spooking any fish that are in the close proximity, this is not a good thing as once spooked it’s very hard to get them back.

There are many variations of fly line however the options we will be concerned with here are weight, density, taper and color.

Fly Fishing Line Weight

AFTM or the Association of Fishing Tackle Manufacturers came up with a standard to measure all fly fishing tackle including the line ratings.

This scale means if you buy a seven weight line from any manufacturer it will fit any seven weight rod and reel from any other manufacturers…cool right! That being said there are always exceptions to the rule but we will not concern ourselves with this now.

The line rating is worked out on the first 10 yards of line or 30ft which is about what you would use to load the rod to make a cast on the old traditional lines.

Loading the rod means flex it enough to perform a cast. Your rod needs a certain amount of weight outside the tip ring to allow it to throw a line. As the line rating number gets higher the line weight gets higher and will require a larger stiffer rod to cast it properly.

As a beginner we have been working on the 10ft 7 AFTM rated setup.

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